Kayville

My family history is heavily centred around Kayville, Saskatchewan.  As such some of the articles have been tagged with "Kayville".  This means that something specific to Kayville or perhaps the area is contained in the write-up.

  • Arcaşul Romanian Dance Troupe II (1935)

    In 1935 a dance troupe in Kayville called Arcaşul (The Archer) was keeping Romanian music, dance and dress alive.  People had to make their own fun in the early days of prairie life.  Joining into community activities and contributing to enriching the lives of others was just good fun.  I imagine these young people entertained at many celebrations around the region!

  • Good Evening, Honourable Guests!

    The life of pioneers was exhausting and full of endless work but somehow they alway made time for fun.  Weddings were as much a celebration as an excuse for a party that would go on for days. Tom Banda recounted some memories from his youth in the 1930's and 1940's as part of his contribution in the book, Land of Promise.

  • Kayville Timeline

    Initially the population of Saskatchewan began around the towns that had traditionally existed along the wagon tracks across the region.  With the arrival of the railroad across the province towns sprang up at regular intervals to service the trains with fuel and water. Slowly the rails pushed the development in those new regions too, just like the one that would become Kayville.

  • Kayville Hotel and Cafe 1924

    In 1924 Alex Bodnaresk built a two storey business with a cafe on the ground floor and hotel rooms on the second floor.  This was Kayville's first hotel and first cafe!

  • Kayville, Saskatchewan

    The town of Kayville, Saskatchewan located approximately 86km/54mi southwest of the Saskatchewan provincial capital city Regina was one of the many small towns that sprung up in the new province to receive immigrants who would settle the Canadian west.  

  • Kayville and Avonlea Drama Company (1928)

    This photo was taken in 1928 and captures what is described as a Kayville and Avonlea drama company.  Maybe you can tell me more but I have to go with that simple description and assume that these people performed Romanian music and dancing.  What fun!

  • Arcaşul Romanian Dance Troupe (1935)

    In 1935 a dance troupe in Kayville called Arcaşul (The Archer) was keeping Romanian music, dance and dress alive.  People had to make their own fun in the early days of prairie life.  Joining into community activities and contributing to enriching the lives of others was just good fun.  I imagine these young people entertained at many celebrations around the region!

  • Dominion Land Survey

    Did you happen to uncover some of your Saskatchewan ancestor's homesteads or farms and end up with a designation like SW-16-09-24-W2?  I'll bet you were excited like I was when I discovered my first one and plugged it into Google Maps only to find out that the mighty Google will not plot it on a map!!  How can you find the location of the land on a map?  I'll help you by sharing with you what I have learned.

  • Lutheran Church Burial Records

    Inside the bell tower at the original Saint Peter and Paul Romanian Orthodox Cemetery northeast of Kayville, Saskatchewan there is a binder that contains information on the burials at the Lutheran Cemetery just west of Kayville, south across the road from the Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church.  Detailed in the document are 13 burials.

  • Alex Trofim

    Alex Trofim was born in the Ciucurova (Çukurova) commune, Tulcea County, Romania but was Russian by heritage.  He immigrated to Canada in 1914 when he was about twenty-nine years old and began homesteading one mile north of Kayville on SE-23-09-24-W2 that same year.  By coincidence, or on purpose, one of his neighbours, Estafi Ritzko, was also a cultural Russian from Romania.  Two years later, in 1916, he married his neighbour's daughter Katrina, ten years his junior.  Together they farmed and raised thirteen children. They would be married fifty-five years until his death in 1971 at the age of 86. He lies in Regina Cemetery in Regina, Saskatchewan.

  • Nicolae Nick Guraluick

    Nicolae "Nick" Guraluick was born in Romania and came to Canada in 1907 at the age of eighteen.  When he arrived he had no money and could not afford to pay for a train ticket to get to western Canada.  He with other young men with the same dire finances would hang around train stations waiting for trains going in the correct direction to begin leaving.  They would run after the trains and try to climb aboard.  If they were successful they would get to nervously ride for a distance.  If the conductor caught anyone without tickets as they passed through the moving train cars checking passengers they would be put off the train.  Nick was removed from trains many times as he crossed the country and was forced to walk great distances along the tracks.  He admitted to crying tears of disappointment as he walked the vast dominion of Canada. In time, he reached Lethbridge, Alberta and found work as a coal miner to earn the money to buy land one and a half miles north of Kayville on SW-24-09-24-W2.  In 1917 and at the age of twenty-eight Nick married the eighteen year old Dominica "Dora" Zauca and over their thirty-one year marriage farmed and raised eight children. Almost 90 years later his son Sam and wife Hedy would become the last residents of Kayville as it faded to become a ghost town.  Nick died young, at the age of fifty-eight, and was laid to rest in the St. Peter And Paul Church (modern) Romanian Orthodox Cemetery, Kayville, Saskatchewan, Canada.

  • Katerina Trofim nee Ritzko

    Katerina Trofim nee Ritzko the daughter of Istafi Ritzko and Maria and niece of Eftim Ritsco.  Her family was cultural Russian from Romania.  She immigrated to Canada with her parents in 1910 at the age of fourteen and lived on her father's homestead NW-14-09-24-W2 north of Kayville. When she was about eighteen another cultural Russian, Alex Trofim, began homesteading next to her father's land.  Two years later, in 1916, twenty year-old Katerina married the thirty-one year-old Alex. She and Alex farmed and raised thirteen children.  They were married fifty-five years when Alex passed away in 1971.  Katerina lived another year following the death of Alex and in 1972 she too died at the age of seventy-five and was laid to rest with him in Regina Cemetery in Regina, Saskatchewan.

  • Mihal Michael Bodnaresk

    Mihal “Michael” Bodnaresk was a farmer and a noted musician in the Kayville community.  The land he farmed was located at SE-24-09-24-W2. In 1936 he married a sixteen year old bride, Victoria Gazuk.

  • Victoria Bodnaresk nee Gazuk

    Victoria Gazuk was the daughter of Nicolai and Angelina Gazuk.  She was born on the family farm (SE of Kayville) at NE-01-09-24-W2, Saskatchewan in 1920.  In 1936 at the age of sixteen she married Mihal “Michael” Bodnaresk, a farmer and a noted musician in the Kayville community.

  • Kayville Citizens 1920

    Photos of large groups are nice to find.  Photos of large groups where someone has identified everyone in them like this one are a treasure!  People from the Kayville area should be familiar with this 1920 photo as it appears in a number of history books about the area and a copy was also hung on the wall of the community centre.  Let's see who's who at the zoo!

  • Spanish Influenza (1918-1919)

    Between the years of 1918 and 1919 Canada was swept by an epidemic of Spanish Influenza (Spanish Flu) which was brought into the country by veterans returning from combat at the end of World War I (WWI). Across the country approximately 50000 people died.  The people living and farming around Kayville, Saskatchewan were not spared.

  • Prairie Grass to Golden Grain

    The book Prairie Grass to Golden Grain: RM 70 Ogema & Surrounding Areas has been a gold mine for me. It focuses on history and families in the Kayville, Saskatchewan area.

  • Saint Mary's Church Burial Records (St. P&P)

    Inside the Saint Peter and Paul Romanian Orthodox Church in Kayville, Saskatchewan there is a binder that contains information about deaths and burials for the St. Mary's Romanian Orthodox Church north of Kayville.  It records 213 burials.

  • Saint Mary's Church Burial Records

    Inside the St Mary's Romanian Orthodox Church north of Kayville, Saskatchewan there is a binder that contains information on all of the burials in the cemetery beside the church.  This record describes 134 graves in the cemetery.

  • Saint Peter and Paul Church Burial Records

    Inside the Saint Peter and Paul Romanian Orthodox Church in Kayville, Saskatchewan there is a binder that contains information on 172 deaths and burials.  Some of the burials documented are in the cemetery by the church. Other burials are in the old cemetery that was beside the church when it was located northeast of the town.