Between the years of 1918 and 1919 Canada was swept by an epidemic of Spanish Influenza (Spanish Flu) which was brought into the country by veterans returning from combat at the end of World War I (WWI). Across the country approximately 50000 people died.  The people living and farming around Kayville, Saskatchewan were not spared.

Photos of large groups are nice to find.  Photos of large groups where someone has identified everyone in them like this one are a treasure!  People from the Kayville area should be familiar with this 1920 photo as it appears in a number of history books about the area and a copy was also hung on the wall of the community centre.  Let's see who's who at the zoo!

In 1935 a dance troupe in Kayville called Arcaşul (The Archer) was keeping Romanian music, dance and dress alive.  People had to make their own fun in the early days of prairie life.  Joining into community activities and contributing to enriching the lives of others was just good fun.  I imagine these young people entertained at many celebrations around the region!

Initially the population of Saskatchewan began around the towns that had traditionally existed along the wagon tracks across the region.  With the arrival of the railroad across the province towns sprang up at regular intervals to service the trains with fuel and water.  The available land offered for homestead began to dwindle around these first centres and pushed settlers to claim their futures progressively farther to the north and south of the railroad.  Slowly the rails pushed the development in those new regions too, just like the one that would become Kayville.

While a handful of Romanians lived in the area around Regina, Saskatchewan as early as 1891 the larger numbers of immigrants didn't start arriving until after 1905.  One of the early families to arrive was the Donisans and in this interesting first-hand account we learn a little bit about their journey to build lives in Canada.

In 1935 a dance troupe in Kayville called Arcaşul (The Archer) was keeping Romanian music, dance and dress alive.  People had to make their own fun in the early days of prairie life.  Joining into community activities and contributing to enriching the lives of others was just good fun.  I imagine these young people entertained at many celebrations around the region!

The life of pioneers was exhausting and full of endless work but somehow they alway made time for fun.  Weddings were as much a celebration as an excuse for a party that would go on for days. Tom Banda recounted some memories from his youth in the 1930's and 1940's as part of his contribution in the book, Land of Promise.