Do you have that one cousin who is always referred to as 'twice removed'?  How many times do you have to 'remove' the guy before he is actually gone?  Will the third time be the charm?

Describing a family relationship has a language all it's own.  Here is a handy chart showing how to refer to the people in your family tree.

I have mentioned that I assumed the role of family genealogist from my mother in the Preface and that she worked with paper.  When I moved the process into the digital age and began using some genealogy software I initially found the idea of documenting sources to be a bit of a curiosity.  

I have been using genealogy software to organize myself since the beginning.  I found that trying to keep paper organized was too challenging and as I didn't know anything about how to perform the research I found using software designed for the process immediately gave me good habits.

Growing up I was surrounded by an extended family and I always loved attending family events.  My parents taught me to call all of the older generations 'Aunt' and 'Uncle' as a sign of respect.  Admittedly this kept things simple but it also kept my real relationship to each of them a mystery to me.

Did you happen to uncover some of your Saskatchewan ancestor's homesteads or farms and end up with a designation like SW-16-09-24-W2?  I'll bet you were excited like I was when I discovered my first one and plugged it into Google Maps only to find out that the mighty Google will not plot it on a map!!  How can you find the location of the land on a map?  I'll help you by sharing with you what I have learned.

If you are familiar with genealogy you are also familiar with the question of 'Why?'.  Genealogy is a task which is theoretically unending and, if we are going to be truthful, one that seems under-appreciated by those who do not share the interest.  The family genealogist often has to justify their efforts to others, and occasionally to themselves.  It might be thousands of hours of work.  Why would anyone do it?

There are organizations out in the world who recognize the importance of preserving family and region histories and making them available to researchers.  Luckily for genealogists these organizations are gathering these essentially rare published works and converting them into digital versions and making them available on the internet.